Pointing the Finger

Yesterday morning, Scott Roeder walked into a church in Kansas and shot Dr. George Tiller to death. Tiller was well-known for being one of only three doctors in the entire country who provides late-term abortions (abortions performed after a fetus reaches 21 weeks). I’d heard of Tiller many times on the news and thought what he did was ghastly, but never would I have ever thought it justified to kill him. I still don’t think he should have been murdered.

A quick summation of my views on abortion: I am mostly pro-life except for my belief that morning-after pills are acceptable in cases of rape. I believe that once a fetus forms a brain and a beating heart it is a child, and terminating that child is murder. In particular I believe that late-term abortions are a heinous crime that never should have been legalized, as it has been proven that late-term babies are capable of understanding that their life is in danger (the belief that it’s a reflexive action to try to escape an abortion doctor’s suction tool does not negate that fact). I believe that this sort of abortion is little more than society’s way of absolving us of accepting responsibility for our actions, because we all know that a very likely consequence of having sex is pregnancy–and a woman’s right to choose can be exercised before it gets to the point that she decides she doesn’t want this child to ruin her life.

That said, I still wholeheartedly condemn Scott Roeder’s actions. The law expressly forbids vigilantism. Taking the law into your own hands and meting out justice as you see it is every bit as illegal as the original crime, and with good reason. If vigilantism were legal innocent people would routinely be targeted. But in no way does any fact justify Dr. Tiller’s murder. My heart goes out to his family.

Now, liberals, you have a prime example of a conservative condemning this action. I have read countless comments on multiple blogs from liberals who have already tried and condemned all Christians and conservatives for Dr. Tiller’s murder. It is a crime to do so this quickly, every bit as it was a crime for Roeder to pick up a gun and pull the trigger in a church to take vengeance in his own way. By pinning this on all of us is as hypocritical as you claim we are. You scream for tolerance, yet you cannot tolerate our beliefs. The crime scene hadn’t even been fully processed before you were all pointing the finger at us for this crime. Within hours, a reader named Dave posted a comment on my post Stop the “Christian Taliban?”:

“When christchuckers continue to kill gynecologists and fertility doctors; then celebrate that murder; while condemning their own gay sons and daughters they will be referred to as the Christian Taliban. If you don’t like it, get the f*** out of my country and move to Saudi Arabia.”

I have a major problem with this. First of all, the last time an ABORTION doctor (note, they are not gynecologists or “fertility doctors”) was murdered was 1998. That was eleven years ago. Right now, liberals are talking about this as if it happens all the time, and it’s simply not true, so please stop that angle. Second, not one sane Christian in this country has celebrated any of the acts that have ever been committed against abortion doctors; it is only the fringe groups who badly misquote and take the bible completely out of context who attempt to use their religion to justify their actions. Just because a handful do that does not mean that I’m at fault for their stupidity. Finally, not one person has been able to give a single accurate reason for labelling Christians the Taliban, because Christians in America don’t beat and execute women for being caught without a male escort in public. Don’t preach at us about extremism when that is the tactic you’re using to discredit us.

This incident has already proven my point about emotion vs. reason. A reasonable, rational person is capable of stopping before reacting and thinking about what would and wouldn’t be appropriate. Liberals, for the most part, react to everything based on an emotional gut reaction and they speak and act before they even try to think about the insinuations they’re making. We wonder why we aren’t getting anything done, well, here’s the reason, staring us dead in the face: too many are too unwilling to see anything from the other side’s perspective before they write the other guy off. Like it or not, libs, it’s usually YOU refusing to talk to US. You’ve just proven that.

If you really want to get the ball rolling to being a more tolerant society, stop pointing the finger at someone else and take a long look in the mirror. If we take little else away from Dr. Tiller’s murder we can at least learn that lesson.

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20 thoughts on “Pointing the Finger

  1. I have a few friends who like to talk about “the christianists” and how they want to march all gay people into gas chambers. The christianists control the Republican party, therefore we can’t have Republicans in office at all any more. They are, you know, the modern day Nazis.

    Second, while they are quick to condemn all conservatives, they haven’t said a word about the shooting at the Army recuiting center in Little Rock is due to anyone in their camp. Nor have I read any conservative blogs calling the same.

  2. I have ultrasound video of my first daughter waving her arms at 12 weeks and 5 days gestation. I saw with my own eyes the heartbeat of my 3rd daughter on ultrasound at 6 weeks exactly. I felt my second daughter moving when I was barely 14 weeks pregnant. (She was also born severely brain-damaged, so don’t even get me started on the whole “it’s okay to kill them when they’re defective” bs). So yeah, I pretty much agree with you 100%. I’m very, VERY pro-life, and also very much against the killing of Tiller. I think the things he did were shocking, horrifying, and completely immoral, but it doesn’t justify shooting him in church.

    Excellent post, as always. I just want to add that it really bothers me that the media has all these quotes from women who praise Tiller’s “services” but none from the women and little girls he left emotionally (and sometimes physically) scarred. Or the families of the women who died under his “care.”

  3. Katie said:

    “What a ridiculous and flawed argument. How about “if you don’t like slavery, don’t own slaves!” Legality and morality aren’t the same thing”

    Talk about a ridiculous argument. There’s quite a glaring difference here. Not only is slavery, unlike abortion, illegal, the issue of slavery is not one of privacy. When slavery was abolished, the government didn’t worm their way into people’s bodies to change the law.

    I am opposed to abortion, and so my remedy becomes (if I should knock anyone up) to not partake in any decision to have one. I really don’t know what I would do if I were on opposite sides of this issue with a girl. Actually, since I don’t make it a habit to have sex with women I don’t know well, I would already know if I were on opposite sides of this issue, and would obviously avoid unprotected sex. In hindsight, this is all pretty common sense.

    Katie, it is possible to be pro life and pro choice. I may be opposed to abortion, but that doesn’t give me the right to impose my morality on others. It’s not my place to judge. If a woman chooses to have an abortion (and I know two who have, and while both of them were in no shape to care for a child, it was still heart breaking to know that they made that choice), I think it should be between her, her significant other, and their God, if any. I really don’t need to know everyone else’s business.

  4. “I just want to add that it really bothers me that the media has all these quotes from women who praise Tiller’s “services” but none from the women and little girls he left emotionally (and sometimes physically) scarred”

    So, you think that this doctor performed abortions of unwilling participants? That’s ludicrous.

  5. “If a woman chooses to have an abortion (and I know two who have, and while both of them were in no shape to care for a child, it was still heart breaking to know that they made that choice), I think it should be between her, her significant other, and their God, if any. ”

    Robert, has anyone close to you ever had an abortion? I hope you never ever experience that. I really mean that too.

    I went to a liberal high school. I grew up in this liberal household. Pro choice all the way.

    My immediate older sister was an addict. She got pregnant. She went behind our backs and got an abortion. She should have kept her mouth shut. But she did not. She told me first. She told our oldest sister next. Then she told our parents and younger sister later.

    Initially I was all fine with this. I told myself this was the best option becuase she was an addict. She was unemployed and unemployable. She probably would not stop using drugs while she was pregnant. I had plenty of reasons to justify this. All I thought was good.

    About two weeks later at work, the wife of one of the salesmen came in with her 3 year old daughter. She was a blonde little lass of a girl. She was tired. She crawled up on her daddy’s lap and fell asleep in his arms as he talked on the phone. The moment was priceless. She loved her daddy and he loved his daughter.

    Then it hit me. It hit me like a grand piano falling off a 10 story building. My sister killed a human being. She prevented a life from turning age three or any age for that matter. She should have gotten help for her drug addiction, carried that baby to term and gave it to a mom and dad who will love it.

    I started to sob. I ran out into the warehouse. My boss hunted me down. She wanted to know what was wrong. I was only 16. She was very understanding. She told me people have to make tough choices and they have to pay for their choices. But they shouldn’t dump the burden of their choices on others especially 16 year olds.

    I went home. My sister was high as a kite. She was her usual flippant self when she was stoned. She knew I was in a bad mood. I told her why. I then told he the next time she gets an abortion she better tell no one.

    So yeah, I am all for this privacy thing you mention Robert. Hopefully people in your life will push privacy to the limit when it comes to the issue of abortion and keep their mouths shut. What you don’t know really won’t hurt you.

  6. “I may be opposed to abortion, but that doesn’t give me the right to impose my morality on others.”

    Then release every prison inmate in the country, because it’s not our business to impose our morality on them. Talk about ridiculous…

  7. “Then release every prison inmate in the country, because it’s not our business to impose our morality on them. Talk about ridiculous…”

    What’s ridiculous about that? You keep trying to equate abortion to some kind of crime, which it isn’t. You want me, and others, to see this through the same lens as you. That won’t happen. I am particularly appalled by late term abortion, because at that point, just have the kid and give it up for adoption. When an abortion is performed at that stage, it still has to come out of the womb the same way a live baby would. I don’t think I would have an objection to outlawing that, but to sit there and say that this issue is in the same ballpark as those who have committed murder, torture, rape, and other heinous acts is ludicrous. I understand your stance, and I can respect it, but something as invasive as legislating what a woman does with her own body is crossing a line, and I’m just as uneasy with that as I am with a woman making the choice to terminate her pregnancy.

  8. “Robert, has anyone close to you ever had an abortion? I hope you never ever experience that. I really mean that too.”

    An ex girlfriend of mine had more than one. I swear this girl is the most fertile human on the planet. If a girl that was carrying my child had this done without my consent (which I would never give), there’s no way in hell I would be able to stay with her. I would never be able to look at her the same.

    “What you don’t know really won’t hurt you.”

    You’re right about that. A girl I was working with told me about her abortion, and it nearly brought me to tears. She basically described someone scraping her insides, and that the baby was, in effect, trying to escape. This girl was as slutty as they came, but hearing her describe that just left me with the biggest feeling of disappointment, partly because she was raised Catholic, and partly because I never thought she would do something like that…

    People may read these stories and wonder how I could be pro choice. It’s not easy, because everything in me is geared towards being pro life, which I am. I just don’t see anything productive coming out of government intervention to force people to do what they think is the right thing. It’s my sincere hope that women chose life, even if it means giving the child up for adoption. But that choice needs to be made with the free will that God gives us. I am not of the mindset that abortion is a form of birth control, and it’s not something I base my position on lightly. When all is said and done, women who want an abortion will get one, regardless of the law. Its legality is the only reason that women don’t routinely die during the procedure. I think the best way to reduce abortions is to better educate people, especially teenagers, on safe sex, and about other available options. The more information that is available, the better the outcome will be, every time.

  9. I wonder if these women you described would change their approach to sex if abortion were illegal?

    I know women who have multiple abortions and use abortion as a method of birth control are not the rule.

    All in all if you don’t want children then there are less exteme ways to prevent pregnancy.

  10. “This girl was as slutty as they came, but hearing her describe that just left me with the biggest feeling of disappointment, partly because she was raised Catholic, and partly because I never thought she would do something like that…”

    I bet she never did that again. Maybe once was enough.

  11. “I wonder if these women you described would change their approach to sex if abortion were illegal?”

    Probably. That’s kind of sad that a law would force someone to change their behavior.

    “I bet she never did that again. Maybe once was enough.”

    I don’t think she did. At least I hope not.

  12. “Probably. That’s kind of sad that a law would force someone to change their behavior.”

    I agree. My younger sister has no children and she never wanted children. Like me, she is north of 40 years old.

    It wasn’t hard for her to avoid getting pregnant.
    When used correctly, birth control is amazingly effective. If it did not work, then I don’t think there would be enough doctors to perform abortions in this country.

  13. “I think the best way to reduce abortions is to better educate people, especially teenagers, on safe sex, and about other available options. The more information that is available, the better the outcome will be, every time.”

    I totally agree. I think such things are needed now more than ever when you have teenagers out there who think oral sex isn’t really sex. When you create your own reality then trouble can come and find you. Who knows what other distorted ideas about sex are making the rounds with today’s teens?

    My next door neighbor teaches middle school (6th – 8th grade). This was the first school year in her memory that did NOT have a pregnant 14 year old enrolled!!! Where I live, Teen Mother schooling doesn’t start until the 9th grade. When they are pregnant and in middle school, they stay where they are in class with everyone else.

    When I was in middle school, girls did not get pregnant. In high school they were expelled immediately and put in teen mothers school (a separate education facility for teen moms and teen moms to be).

    If the father to be was also in high school, he too was expelled. But, in my life I never learned where those guys went to finish their educations.

  14. “Probably. That’s kind of sad that a law would force someone to change their behavior.”

    Is that not, to a degree, the purpose of the law? To change a behavior that would otherwise harm other people? By this logic, we should scrap DUI laws because they aim to change behaviors that include going out to have a good time, drinking, then driving while unable to fully control that two-ton rolling steel deathtrap that’s dangerous even when sober.

    If the law didn’t say you can’t mete out justice your own way, people would be stringing up those they deem to be criminals all the time. So because the law changes that behavior and requires that citizens allow the legal system to handle victimizers, and it would make the victims feel better to take their own justice, we should change it?

    The principal here is the same. There is some degree to which the law is meant to make people change certain behaviors. Believe it or not, people are NOT really inherently good. In case we hadn’t noticed you don’t have to teach a child to do what’s wrong; you have to correct their behavior and teach them what’s right. That doesn’t change with age.

  15. “By this logic, we should scrap DUI laws because they aim to change behaviors that include going out to have a good time, drinking, then driving while unable to fully control that two-ton rolling steel deathtrap that’s dangerous even when sober.”

    Yes and no. DUI laws should obviously remain intact, but I do think it’s sad that people don’t voluntarily keep other people’s safety in mind when the issue of driving drunk presents itself. Don’t you?

  16. I see people affected by DUI regularly. I do think it’s sad. It’s sad that people don’t stop to think about how a great many of the choices they make would affect others. When a person decides they want something and they’re willing to take it by force, they don’t think about how it will affect their target. When a person buys narcotics to feed their addiction, they don’t think about how their actions are leading to the violence, death and destruction in other countries.

    There are a lot of things that people don’t think about. That’s why the law is there–to give incentive to be civil.

  17. “Is that not, to a degree, the purpose of the law? To change a behavior that would otherwise harm other people?”

    I see it differently. The purpose of a law is to punish people who disobey. If nobody ever committed murder then would you need a law making murder a crime?

    A real life example of that happened two years ago in CA. It was not and is still not illegal for a woman to breastfeed her baby in public. When it came to that issue, the law did not exist in CA.

    So, what did the CA legislature do? It passed a law making it legal to do so.

    Why legalize something that is already legal and the public has no problem with?

  18. I see your point, however, why do we punish those who disobey if not to change the behaviors of others who would follow the same road to some extent?

    It brings up a very good question, though: if the law is not meant to change behavior and the subsequent punishment is punitive only and not meant as a deterrent, then why be against the death penalty?

    The argument comes full-circle now.

  19. “It brings up a very good question, though: if the law is not meant to change behavior and the subsequent punishment is punitive only and not meant as a deterrent, then why be against the death penalty?

    The argument comes full-circle now.”

    This is why. We don’t throw people in prison for life for getting too many parking tickets. The punishment has to fit the crime. My definition of punishment may not match up with your definition.

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